A New Insight Into How DNA Is Held Together

Chalmers University of Technology

DNA is constructed of two strands, consisting of sugar molecules and phosphate groups. Between these two strands are nitrogen bases, the compounds which make up organisms’ genes, with hydrogen bonds between them. Those hydrogen bonds have sometimes been seen as crucial to holding the two strands together.

But now, researchers from Chalmers University of Technology show that the secret to DNA’s helical structure may be that the molecules have a hydrophobic interior, in an environment consisting mainly of water. The environment is therefore hydrophilic, while the DNA molecules’ nitrogen bases are hydrophobic, pushing away the surrounding water. When hydrophobic units are in a hydrophilic environment, they group together, to minimise their exposure to the water.

Link to the paper:

Hydrophobic Catalysis and a Potential Biological Role of DNA Unstacking Induced by Environmental Effects

Latest articles

Dawn Lester & David Parker … As we have shown in many...
Dawn Lester & David Parker Modern medicine is widely acclaimed as being...
Dawn Lester & David Parker In parts one and two, we showed...
Dawn Lester & David Parker In the three previous parts of this...
Roger Koops For those who may not recall Chicken Little (AKA Henny...
Tristan Coleman Does the latest ‘climate consensus’ study show a genuine agreement...

Thank you!

Thank you for your membership application. As soon as your payment has been received your membership will be activated and you will be informed via email.

Thank you.

Thank you!

The form has been submitted successfully!