Effects of N1-Methyl-Pseudouridine in the Pfizer mRNA Vaccine

Daniel B. Demers

The use of messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines has been developing since 1990.  Historically, there have been three significant problems associated with mRNA vaccines.  First, it has always been a challenge for vaccine developers to get the desired mRNA into the cells of choice (the delivery problem).  Second, introducing a foreign RNA (the vaccine mRNA) into a patient causes their body to initiate an innate immune response thereby causing pathogenesis when there actually was no infection (the immunogenicity problem).  And third, RNAs are rapidly degraded by ribonucleases (RNases) which are enzymes that degrade RNA.  These RNases are found virtually everywhere which not only hinders development, but also makes it difficult to get a desired mRNA in a vaccine to stay around long enough to elicit the desired response (the degradation problem) …

The claim among mRNA vaccine manufacturers and some scientists is that the three problems cited above have been solved; but have they?

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