Like Venom Coursing Through the Body: Researchers Identify Mechanism Driving COVID-19 Mortality

Rosemary Brandt

Researchers from the University of Arizona, in collaboration with Stony Brook University and Wake Forest School of Medicine, analyzed blood samples from two COVID-19 patient cohorts and found that circulation of the enzyme – secreted phospholipase A2 group IIA, or sPLA2-IIA, – may be the most important factor in predicting which patients with severe COVID-19 eventually succumb to the virus.

The sPLA2-IIA enzyme, which has similarities to an active enzyme in rattlesnake venom, is found in low concentrations in healthy individuals and has long been known to play a critical role in defense against bacterial infections, destroying microbial cell membranes.

… Together with available clinically tested sPLA2-IIA inhibitors, “the study supports a new therapeutic target to reduce or even prevent COVID-19 mortality,” said study co-author Maurizio Del Poeta, a SUNY distinguished professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology in the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University.

Latest articles

www.womensvoices.org A recent report by the nonprofit Women’s Voices for the Earth...
www.womensvoices.org Period products are used on and in highly sensitive and absorptive...
www.womenvoices.org In recent years, the use of nanosilver as an antibacterial agent...
Carla Peeters Thus far scientific literature on graphene-derived products is mainly focused...
Outraged Human GRAPHENE FAMILY NANOPARTICLES can be delivered into bodies by intratracheal...

Thank you!

The form has been submitted successfully!